How to Deal Emotionally with Living Alone

Before the start of the pandemic, the effects of loneliness didn’t seem as severe to those with easy access to a social circle. But since everyone has gone through at least one lockdown cycle, most of us are now aware of how it affects the most vulnerable people.

Many studies have pointed out that living alone can have a significant effect on mental health. It can trigger symptoms of depression and other mental conditions the longer a person lives alone. 

Whether you live alone as an employee or as a student, it’s important to know how you can deal with being away from friends and family members. Here are a few ways that might help out. 

Identify your isolation

Loneliness and isolation can feel subjective sometimes. One can feel lonely without being isolated, while also feeling isolated but not necessarily lonely. 

Looking at this distinction helps you identify where and when you feel alone in your life. 

Do you feel most lonely even among others who love you and care for you? Did you lose a loved one and can’t get over the feeling that they could still be around? Or has your job required you to move to a location too far from family and friends?

There are many causes of isolation that one needs to pinpoint if they want to start somewhere in coping with loneliness. You might even be able to reevaluate your views on living alone on whether you prefer it or not.

Knowing the difference between isolation and loneliness can help you determine what to do to guard your mental health.

Embrace some new hobbies

Living alone gives you the advantage of having a lot of free time. Why not use that to try and pick up a new hobby?

Embracing new hobbies can help keep your mind off the crippling feeling of loneliness, if only for a little while. 

Try improving a skill or revisiting a sport or activity you loved doing before. Not only does a hobby provide mental stimulation, but it can also help you focus on improving yourself throughout your time in isolation.

Jot down your thoughts

Thoughts can weigh heavy on the mind. That is why one of the best things you can do is write them down in a notebook.

You don’t need to write full details of your entire day to do this unless you have to. You can simply write down something good that might have happened or recount an experience (either positive or negative) that could serve as a lesson.

It doesn’t matter what kind of schedule you set for this, just as long as it becomes a daily habit. Your mind will achieve full clarity once you have laid out your thoughts on paper. 

Keep in touch with your connections

No matter how far apart you feel you are from your friends and family, it always pays to keep in touch with them every once in a while.

Maintaining connections keeps your emotional balance strong as you deal with living alone. Text a friend about your day or start a video chat with a family member and ask what’s happening back at home. 

Who knows? They might be feeling isolated on their end, too, so reaching out can help provide them with emotional comfort. 

Reach out for help if you need it

The longer you remain isolated, the more you develop adverse effects that can take a toll on your mental health. These may include insomnia, anxiety attacks, or even dementia. 

In this case, you need to reach out to a mental health specialist who can diagnose what you are going through and prescribe treatment options that can provide relief as you live alone. That way, you can steer clear of the more serious effects of isolation before it’s too late. 

Mid Cities Psychiatry understands how living alone can affect your mental state, and we want to know the kind of help you need to secure your emotional and social well-being. 

Allow us to help out. Contact us today!

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